International Medical Education Fellowship

U.K.
Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons (FRCS) is a professional qualification to practise as a surgeon in the British Isles. It is bestowed by the Royal College of Surgeons of England, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (chartered 1784), Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (chartered 1505), and Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow though strictly the unqualified initials refer to the London College. Several Commonwealth countries have similar qualifications, among them the FRCSC in Canada, FRACS in Australia and New Zealand, FCS(SA) in South Africa.

The original fellowship was available in general surgery and in certain specialties - ophthalmic or ENT surgery, or obstetrics and gynaecology - which were not indicated in the initials. It came to be taken mid-way through training.


There are now a range of higher fellowships, taken at the end of higher specialist training and often in narrower fields, the first of which was FRCS (Orth) in orthopaedics. Others include FRCS (Urol) in urology and FRCS (OMFS) in maxillofacial surgery.

To avoid confusion, the original fellowship was renamed to either membership MRCS or associate fellowship (AFRCS). Unfortunately this introduced a new confusion, as the Royal Colleges also held qualifying examinations in medicine, after which most of them awarded licentiate diplomas (LRCP, LRCS, etc). However the Royal College of Surgeons of England used to award its membership at this level, in conjunction with the Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians/

Holders of FRCS (and the new, but not old, Membership - MRCS) often choose to relinquish their title of "Doctor", reverting to "Mr", "Mrs" or "Miss".

MRCS is a professional qualification for surgeons in the UK and Ireland

It means Member of the Royal College of Surgeons. In the United Kingdom, doctors who gain this qualification traditionally no longer use the title 'Dr' but start to use the title 'Mr', 'Mrs', 'Miss' or 'Ms'. There are 4 surgical colleges in the UK & Ireland:

* The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
* The Royal College of Surgeons of England
* The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow
* The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

Each college used to hold examinations independently, but latterly to a common syllabus. However, in January 2004, the four colleges switched over to a common examination, known as the Intercollegiate MRCS.

The separate qualifications used to be Fellowships (F.R.C.S.), but a new set of higher fellowships in specialised fields such as orthopaedics, urology, etc, has been set up to be taken at the end of Higher Surgical Training: this is now the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons.

Disparities In Access To Palliative Care  — Health Affairs
Postgraduate training opportunities for all disciplines involved in providing palliative care, such as graduate medical education slots, should be increased.

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