By Henry Davis | News Medical

Navy Medical Education Training Campus

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (Dec. 12, 2011) The Medical Education & Training Campus (METC) hosted medical officers from the Nigerian navy December 12-13 for a tour and discussions about medical training capabilities and curriculum. During their visit, Commodore C.A. Abu, Surgeon for the Nigerian Western Naval Command, Capt. David Rollo, Maritime Affairs Officer for Western Africa, Cmdr. R.O. Popoola, a Nigerian Navy Surgeon General staff member, and Capt. I.V. Ansa, Commander of Nigeria's School of Health Sciences were given a tour of the Surgical Technician Program by Air Force Maj. Shelley Shelton (far left). (U.S. Navy photo by Lisa Braun/Released)
FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas -
The Medical Education & Training Campus (METC) hosted medical officers from the Nigerian navy December 12-13 for a tour and discussions about medical training capabilities and curriculum, the first step in an ongoing effort by METC, in coordination with U.S. Naval Forces Africa (NAVAF), to assist the Nigerians with improving their military medical training capabilities.

Working through NAVAF, METC will assess the Nigerian navy’s medical training programs, make recommendations for improvement and help with curriculum development. Part of the NAVAF mission is to support medical capacity building in partner nations through Africa Partnership Station (APS). APS is a series of activities designed to build maritime safety and security in Africa through working together with African and other international partners.

Commodore C.A. Abu, Surgeon for the Nigerian Western Naval Command; Capt. I.V. Ansa, Commander of Nigeria’s School of Health Sciences; and Cmdr. R.O. Popoola, a Nigerian Navy Surgeon General staff member, toured the Surgical Technician Program, Basic Medical Technician/Corpsman Program (BMTCP), and the Department of Combat Medic Training (DCMT), as well as engaged in discussions with faculty and staff to share information about current capabilities and what they hoped to gain from their visit.

“We have come, we have seen, and we are taking a lot back home from this visit, ” said Abu, who was impressed with the joint training environment he observed during his visit. “What [METC is] doing here is an eye opener.” He pointed out how joint training makes sense because “we’re on the same team.”

The visitors were also amazed at how relatively quickly students complete their training at METC, compared to the training curriculum window for Nigeria's school. This is one aspect they hope to change with METC's help.

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